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Georgia Journal of Science

Article Title

PERIOSTEAL REACTION AND SIGNS OF STRESS FOUND IN SKELETAL REMAINS FROM IERAPETRA, CRETE

Abstract

In this study, I examined periosteal reactions within a population to determine evidence of stress and disease. The bones studied date from the Roman Crete period, which ranged from 69 BC to 961 AD. This period is historically marked as a time when the island was part of a very prosperous trade route. While there are some studies which include examinations of evidence of disease present on skeletal remains, the Roman Crete period is largely unaccounted for. This study seeks to recognize patterns of perosteal reaction from a population excavated from Ierapetra, Crete. These Roman period skeletons were studied over four seasons from 2013 to 2016 and the data were subsequently analyzed. Overall, eighty-four instances of periosteal reaction were recorded and analyzed. We compared the results to populations with existing research from Santa Barbara, Mycenae, and The Democratic Republic of Congo. We found that the patterns of periosteal reactions pointed to a probability of stress afflicting the overall population.

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