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Georgia Journal of Science

Article Title

AN ANALYSIS OF MIDDLE WOODAND PERIOD POTTERY FROM THE LOWER DABBS SITE IN NORTH GEORGIA

Abstract

Recent archaeological investigations on the Etowah River, near the Leake Site in Cartersville, Georgia, have uncovered many cultural features dating to the Middle Woodland (300 BC-AD 700) period. We have an understanding of how prehistoric Native Americans lived in this area in the shadow of Etowah during the Mississippian (AD 1000-1550) period. However, we know very little about how small villages, like the Lower Dabbs Site, interacted with Leake, the preeminent site in the region during the Middle Woodland. Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of the artifacts recovered from the features at Lower Dabbs will provide much needed information about the daily lives of the people living in the shadow of Leake. Of prime importance is being able to date the ceramic material found in the features to determine the exact relationship chronologically between both sites. During the Middle Woodland stamped pottery is common. A detailed analysis of these decorations, focusing on unique designs found within the assemblages, will allow us to compare our results with those from Leake to see what patterns, if any, emerge. Similar decorative patterning may indicate a close relationship existed between these sites given they are located across the Etowah River from one another. Through our analysis we can explore the connections that once existed between these sites, among others, in the Etowah River Valley.

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