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Georgia Journal of Science

Article Title

THE BIOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE TUGALO SITE (9ST1): DIET, DISEASE AND HEALTH OF THE PAST**

Abstract

Tugalo is known to be a prehistoric site located in northeast Georgia near the junction of Toccoa Creek and the Tugalo River. In October 1956, Dr Joseph R. Caldwell, a Smithsonian archaeologist at the time, began excavations of the mound found at Tugalo (Williams and Branch, 1978). Using the stratigraphy and discerning there was no proper hiatus at Tugalo, Caldwell came up with three possibilities to determine the date of occupation at Tugalo and who might have occupied it. There is a need to conduct research using Tugalo burials to get a better understanding of the lives of the inhabitants. For example, what did they eat, if any, diseases or health problems did they endure? By analyzing data collected by Williamson (1998) concerning the age and sex of the burials, the presence or absence of dental caries, dental measurements, dental enamel defects, and lesions indicative of infection and osteoarthritis this thesis will address the diet, health and behavior of Tugalo's occupants. These findings will add knowledge and information to the already available literature of the site, and they will help give more complete picture of life at Tugalo.

Acknowledgements

Dr. Matthew A. Williamson

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