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Georgia Journal of Science

Article Title

TERRESTRIAL ISOPOD SPECIES DISTRIBUTION AROUND YOUNG HARRIS COLLEGE, GA

Abstract

Terrestrial isopods are overall highly understudied, especially the native species of southern Appalachian. Local species distribution and local disturbance can have drastic effects on the local biodiversity and harm native species that are particularly susceptible to change. In this experiment, local terrestrial isopod species distribution was examined surrounding Young Harris, GA. Logistic regression was used to examine whether native/non-native status was predictable by whether a specimen was found in disturbed or natural areas. The results were statistically significant (p < 0.05) supporting the idea that native species prefer undisturbed areas. The other part of the study observed variance in identifying features of Ligidium elrodii. These features are the antennae segment numbers and the male reproductive appendage. These features were examined and compared to the overall length of the specimen to determine if the variance was related to size as opposed to suggesting another species being present. Our results indicate that human activity has altered native isopod distribution, and that some morphological features are not diagnostic species identifiers.

Acknowledgements

Young Harris College Curriculm Enrichment fund

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